Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby ChiliPepper » Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:09 am

Ridin_Dirty wrote:Thank you both for your response. If I did go FS, I'm leaning toward the XR-Pro. Do you think this would be a good choice? Also, there are quite a few bike trails at this state park, so I'm pretty sure there may be more complex trails. If I did happen to find a 10' drop, can I go for it (if I upgrade suspension, etc.)?! :mrgreen: Or should I stay clear and save up for a LBS bike before graduating to those trails?

If I go hardtail, I may consider putting a little more money into it (since I'll save on not having to upgrade a rear shock) and purchase an Airborne Guardian. I saw it mentioned in another thread by Irishmongooserider.

XR-Pro is a good all around XC, AM to Trail bike for sure, but hucking it off a 10' drop (if you are speaking of a 10' step-down/drop-off) is NOT a very good idea (even if you upgrade the suspension). You would need at least 6" to 8" travel as well to handle such a big drop-off. A big hit HT can handle it as well (like mine), but it is very hard on the feet and ankles doing so. But hey, if you are young and full of energy, then go for it...lol. If you are speaking of a drop-in (roll in), then by all means she is a good bike for this. You would most likely have to change up (upgrade) the suspension to a better one to keep the pedal-bob down, and make it more set-up for your weight for a more comfortable ride.

If the trails are pretty much like the ones in the video you previously posted, then by all means a HT would suffice, and might be the best (personal preference though), because the HT will be lighter and much faster on XC type trail than a FS which will be much heavier. All in all, get what you want brother...seriously. One way or another you'll have fun if it is fun that's your goal.

You will need either one of these to huck off a 10' step-down/drop-off. Trust me brother, I huck off much bigger step-downs/drop-offs than 10'. My biggest one yet was 24', but at my age now and a few injuries later, I really only drop-off 10' or less now....

8" travel steed...
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7" travel steed...
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Big hit HT (hardtail). Has a 160mm Domain fork now, which has bigger stanchions...
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My 6" travel steed I am building (I wouldn't even huck this off a 10' step-down/drop-off...
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Last edited by ChiliPepper on Fri Jan 31, 2014 12:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby mirroredtoolbag » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:50 am

10' drop off is like riding your bike off the roof, even if you have a long travel susser and you have not done it before, you may want to scale it back some unless of course you are submitting a vid for "ridiculousness" The XR pro is a pretty rugged bike and holds up to well in some pretty sever terrain with a few suspension mods but I would not recommend it for DH or jumps or big drops.
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby wa_desert_rat » Fri Jan 31, 2014 10:29 am

As Chili says, this is mostly a matter of personal preference. I see a lot of big box FS bikes around and I'm pretty sure that it's become a fad; especially when I look at the guys pedaling them down the sidewalk with their knees bent and the seat posts too short and with no bike helmet at all. So my original thought in this thread was not so much to discourage trail riders from buying a FS bicycle but to get people who really aren't ever going to be trail riders to take a closer look at what they wanted the bike for.

If you were just going to ride your bike to the store once a week or to work now and then I'd really try to dissuade you from any FS. But actually riding on trails takes us into another level and an XR-Pro would be a decent bike for that trail in the video. But probably NOT for 10' drops.. or even 5' drops. Most of us think a HT would be a better choice but if you want a FS bike - and your plans include an XR-Pro - then, what the heck... get what you want.

The XR-Pro is clearly one of the best choices for an entry-level FS bicycle no matter who sells it. One of the great virtues of the XR-Pro is that you can buy BOTH it and a Mongoose Stat and have a HT and a FS bike in your stable for less than you can buy an entry-level HT from an LBS. This, in my opinion, is the best virtue of buying from a big box store in the first place. Not many of us can afford to buy a top-of-the-line LBS bike just to try a new bike out to see if we like it. But a lot of us can afford two big box bikes.

And if you decide you like the XR-Pro and decide that you want to take on 10' drops you can always save your money for one of those behemoths that Chili rides. :P

Here on bigboxbikes.com we like to look at ourselves as people who actually look at issues in a logical and straightforward way and not just parrot the ideas that the "elite" snobs on most forums put out. But I think most of us agree that an HT is the best bike to start riding trails on. They are lighter and more maneuverable and much better for honing skills that you eventually need on really technical trails. After all, even the best FS bike will still need to be hopped over some roots and ledges; you can go OTB from a FS bike, too, ya know. :)

Craig
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby ChiliPepper » Fri Jan 31, 2014 12:27 pm

mirroredtoolbag wrote:10' drop off is like riding your bike off the roof, even if you have a long travel susser and you have not done it before, you may want to scale it back some unless of course you are submitting a vid for "ridiculousness" The XR pro is a pretty rugged bike and holds up to well in some pretty sever terrain with a few suspension mods but I would not recommend it for DH or jumps or big drops.

If he wants to huck off 10' step-downs/drop-offs and doesn't have the skillz for it, he needs to go and watch my tutorials about hucking and freeriding first in the "MTB Riding Technique" forum...lol

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2930

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2929
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby ChiliPepper » Fri Jan 31, 2014 12:37 pm

wa_desert_rat wrote:And if you decide you like the XR-Pro and decide that you want to take on 10' drops you can always save your money for one of those behemoths that Chili rides. :P

Craig

Thanks bro, that just made my day... :lol: :lol: :lol:

Craig is correct, if you want to go big hit, then save up for a bigger and more beefy bike my friend. Three of my bikes are built to take extreme abuse, and the two biggest ones (chrome one and SC Bullit) are made up of parts to handle high speeds through smooth or gnarly terrain and take some serious big hits. The biggest that the big steed (chrome one) has seen is a 24' step-down/drop-off and has been at speeds exceeding 40 mph on dirt. :mrgreen:

Now, I have hucked my '04 Mongoose Blackcomb off of 3' to 5' step-downs/drop-offs before, and it handled it well, just need the skillz to do it right and better suspension and parts as well. ;)
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby Ridin_Dirty » Sat Feb 01, 2014 11:44 am

ChiliPepper wrote:You will need either one of these to huck off a 10' step-down/drop-off. Trust me brother, I huck off much bigger step-downs/drop-offs than 10'. My biggest one yet was 24', but at my age now and a few injuries later, I really only drop-off 10' or less now....


Thank you for sharing your bikes and your tutorial thread. Are all of these 26ers? When I graduate to that level of MTB'ing, do you recommend I invest in a 26er for step-downs/drop-offs as opposed to a 29er?

mirroredtoolbag wrote:10' drop off is like riding your bike off the roof, even if you have a long travel susser and you have not done it before, you may want to scale it back some unless of course you are submitting a vid for "ridiculousness" The XR pro is a pretty rugged bike and holds up to well in some pretty sever terrain with a few suspension mods but I would not recommend it for DH or jumps or big drops.


I don't think 10' fully registered until reading this post and seeing the vids in ChiliPepp's tutorial thread...lol. I'll definitely have to take baby steps to get there.

wa_desert_rat wrote:...If you were just going to ride your bike to the store once a week or to work now and then I'd really try to dissuade you from any FS. But actually riding on trails takes us into another level and an XR-Pro would be a decent bike for that trail in the video...One of the great virtues of the XR-Pro is that you can buy BOTH it and a Mongoose Stat and have a HT and a FS bike in your stable for less than you can buy an entry-level HT from an LBS...


Yes, I'll definitely be hitting the trails. I have a big box road bike (Triace S503) which I love and use for general riding. I also like the thought of investing in both an FS and a HT. I think I will go for the XR-Pro and pick up a HT after my bank account recovers...lol.
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby wa_desert_rat » Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:19 pm

Ridin_Dirty wrote:
Thank you for sharing your bikes and your tutorial thread. Are all of these 26ers? When I graduate to that level of MTB'ing, do you recommend I invest in a 26er for step-downs/drop-offs as opposed to a 29er?


It's not enough in the MTB world that we have to choose between FS, HT and rigid... we also have to choose between 26ers and 29ers, DH bikes, FM bikes, XC bikes... and on and on.

Since I am far better at buying bikes than I am at selling them (apparently), I have a collection of bicycles dating back to the 1950s (my wife's childhood cruiser) and the early 1970s (my Peugeot PX10). It's a personality flaw.

I still like 26ers but to be perfectly frank I don't ride my Trek 4500 very often. My wife rides it more frequently than I do. I usually ride the Deception. Or the Schwin Tourist if I'm going shopping. But on a trail the Deception is my go-to bike. My Trek Y50 is second choice. This begs the question, "Would I buy another 26er?"

Ya, depending. The Y50, obviously, is a 26er modified with a Marz 66 fork and an amazing rear shock. But if I bought another bike tomorrow it would be an XR-Pro. I hadn't thought about it much 'til now and I'm a little surprised at my choice... but that is such a great platform to start from that it just makes sense.

So I guess I'd say stick to 29ers. Even though there is a huge place for 26ers; especially on highly technical trails. But I don't do highly technical trails... I mostly ride old Jeep and even mule train trails.

Craig
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby ChiliPepper » Sat Feb 01, 2014 6:37 pm

Ridin_Dirty wrote:Thank you for sharing your bikes and your tutorial thread. Are all of these 26ers? When I graduate to that level of MTB'ing, do you recommend I invest in a 26er for step-downs/drop-offs as opposed to a 29er?

Anytime and your very welcome brother. Yes, the ones pictured above (previously) are all 26ers. Yes, I highly recommend investing in a 26er before any 29er for any DH, FR, DJ, or aggressive slopestyle disciplined riding. The 26ers are just much stronger than the 29ers and will by far hold up better than a 29er for this discipline riding. Just make sure you get a wheel-set strong enough (to take the abusive without blowing up or folding in...lol) for this discipline riding though. Yes, they have introduced the 29er for DH racing, but extremely limited though and not recommended.

Ridin_Dirty wrote:I don't think 10' fully registered until reading this post and seeing the vids in ChiliPepp's tutorial thread...lol. I'll definitely have to take baby steps to get there.

:lol: :lol: :lol: ...Yes sir, definitely baby steps for sure. You will definitely need to step out of your comfort zone to get there and become skilled. If we lived closer bro, I would be more than happy to take you on as a grasshopper...lol.

Ridin_Dirty wrote:Yes, I'll definitely be hitting the trails. I have a big box road bike (Triace S503) which I love and use for general riding. I also like the thought of investing in both an FS and a HT. I think I will go for the XR-Pro and pick up a HT after my bank account recovers...lol.

I am glad you made your choice in either FS or HT and I know you will enjoy it. Just be a bit easy at first until you gain confidence in your bike and soon to be newly acquired skills. Hang in there bro! :mrgreen:
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Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby BoomerBrian » Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:02 am

I would be careful of a 10' drop on any type of bike. Just make sure your skill level is there because you can get hurt on full squish as well if you don't know how to land it.

Guardian is a nice starter hard tail 29er. It will be hard to find anything better in that price range.


Edit: sorry guys. On my mobile device and didn't realize there was another page of replies. :-)

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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby Ridin_Dirty » Sun Mar 30, 2014 7:20 pm

BoomerBrian wrote:I would be careful of a 10' drop on any type of bike. Just make sure your skill level is there because you can get hurt on full squish as well if you don't know how to land it.

Guardian is a nice starter hard tail 29er. It will be hard to find anything better in that price range.


Edit: sorry guys. On my mobile device and didn't realize there was another page of replies. :-)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


No need for apologies. Your response was very helpful. ChiliPepp's video scared the beJesus out of me, so I won't be taking any 10' drops anytime soon...lol. I pulled the trigger on purchasing the XR-Pro, and it's pretty awesome. I'm still considering the Guardian as a hardtail to add to the collection.
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