Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby ChiliPepper » Tue Apr 01, 2014 7:09 am

Ridin_Dirty wrote:I would be careful of a 10' drop on any type of bike. Just make sure your skill level is there because you can get hurt on full squish as well if you don't know how to land it.

Very true brother, so very true. Another thing to add to this great advise. Not only do you need the skills to land the drop-off (step-down), but also to send itand knowing the proper speed coming it to it as well. Not knowing these latter two can get you into much trouble and a possible long term hospital stay at any height drop-off (step-down). Drop ins (roll ins) are quite different and much more manageable for unskilled riders. Just get back and low and if you use the front brake (power brake), just feather it, not grabbing...lol. The rear is just a rudder, not the power brake. Thus why bigger rotors up front than the rear rotors in the rear are always good for heat resistance and less break fade possibilities. ;) :mrgreen:

BoomerBrian wrote:No need for apologies. Your response was very helpful. ChiliPepp's video scared the beJesus out of me, so I won't be taking any 10' drops anytime soon...lol. I pulled the trigger on purchasing the XR-Pro, and it's pretty awesome. I'm still considering the Guardian as a hardtail to add to the collection.

Awesome brother! Sorry, I wasn't trying to scare you, just educate...lol. I am always doing my best to encourage others of all various skill levels to never give up, but just to do it within your comfort zone. If this is the discipline riding you want to try, just get with riders that are skilled in this FR disciplined shredding, and listen, learn, and then step out. You will HAVE TO step out of your comfort zone though bro. ;)

To better understand freeriding, freeriding is a state of mind... a passion for discovering one's limits, and then pushing those limits to take you to new heights (literally!). Freeriding can free you, at least for a while, from whatever balls you up during the day.

FREERIDING

In general, there is no concrete definition for freeriding besides what is mentioned above (shortened to “FR”); it can be pretty much anything you want it to be. But it is generally accepted that freeriding includes foreboding terrain that may or may not have been spiced up with man-made stunts or features. These can include ladder bridges, teeter-totters, jumps, and drops (also known as “hucks”), but also might simply be downed trees or natural faces.

In short, freeriding is mountain biking at the fringe or sometimes on the edge of insanity, and as such, it demands cutting-edge equipment and
skills.
ChiliPepper
 

Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby A1Yola » Fri Jun 13, 2014 4:52 pm

I have a full suspension mountain bike with an Aluminum frame and the last word I'd use to describe it is Heavy. My FS MTB is so light, that I get more air than I want at times!
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby BoomerBrian » Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:02 pm

A1Yola wrote:I have a full suspension mountain bike with an Aluminum frame and the last word I'd use to describe it is Heavy. My FS MTB is so light, that I get more air than I want at times!


The point is hard tails are lighter and if it is a bbb fs bike you have then it isn't light unless you have some done a lot of mods.


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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby Nagant » Mon Jun 16, 2014 3:16 am

The big box store aluminum frame Mongoose XR-75 full suspension bike I have is possibly the heaviest bike I have. That's saying something because I have some balloon tire heavy weight cruisers from the late 1940's onward. Only the main frame is aluminum on that XR though, the rear swing arm is steel. The pogo stick front fork feels like a ton of dead weight. It's the only bike I own that I have grown to completely dislike. I own other inexpensive box store bikes that are rigid steel frames and enjoy riding them. If I had taken the time to do a little online research I would have never bought the XR-75 back in 2010. Maybe someday I will make some changes to it to try and make it a more pleasurable ride.
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby junkyarddog » Thu Jun 19, 2014 4:15 pm

yeah I was looking at the XR-75 as well as a few others when I was buying a bike a few years ago....I liked the V2100 as well, but didnt have enough cash.....luckly at the last minute I got some extra money, so I was excited to get a V2100....even though it is the heaviest bike I have ever owned I still like it.... its also the f/s I have owned....most of the bikes I have owned over the years have been rigid...the last 2 before I stopped riding were hardtails.... I check everything on my bike between rides
89 specialized rockhopper- SS BMX hybrid
97 specialized rockhopper-7 speed mild trail bike
roadmaster mtn sport 24"- wifes
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby junkyarddog » Tue Jul 15, 2014 10:27 pm

even with meticulus maintenence the main pivot bushings wore out on my V2100.... I think I had somewhere around 100 miles on it...which would be very often once I get riding longer rides.....even though kent sent me the bushings for free, I decided that plus the bob issues and some other stuff, that I like hardtails better... though my weight might have caused the bushings to wear quicker.... was gonna get it back together and sell it so I could get a hardtail....now I have a rigid( murray baja) for road riding and a hardtail ( specialized rockhopper) for trail riding and the V2100 is sitting in my garage minus shifters, brake levers, wheels, pedals, rear deraileur, grips etc etc...the rock hopper I got for $5 and $2 for the murray....I am sure some of the negative reviews these bikes get on walmart.com are by people that ride them and dont do proper maintenence
89 specialized rockhopper- SS BMX hybrid
97 specialized rockhopper-7 speed mild trail bike
roadmaster mtn sport 24"- wifes
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby Falkon45 » Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:32 pm

Well, the bushing thing is noticeable. But, they are plastic. Some grease could help extend longevity, but wouldn't help much. Im thinking of trying to press some bearings into my blackcomb (which has the same bushings) to alleviate that issue.
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby Tomcat65 » Sat Aug 02, 2014 9:13 am

I saw a young guy, with a young family, looking at bikes in the local Walmart a few months ago. He had a Next Power Climber on the floor, the most common full suspension steel frame bike out there for around $100 to $120.

I bought this bike for my son when he was 10. It wasn't the best purchase I ever made, but we keep our bikes inside and it's still in great condition. But it's 35lb and feels like it weighs 50, for such a small frame bike, the rear suspension gives so much to bob and is so mushy, that it's literally harder to ride than my 20 year old steel frame 26" hardtail.. So, He ends up riding my old bike or his lil BMX 20" and I have put mega miles on his fs bike. But, Honestly, I like it! lol :) It is fun to mess with, ride something a lil crazy, like a 25* by 18" jump, it recovers well every time and my son lol's every time the 45y/o kid does it. It wheelies, but not smoothly, it goes pretty fast, but not as fast as the old hardtail.

I could have told that guy to not waste his money, but he was there with his 10 year old son, and the memories came back... I smiled, told him not to expect it to ride like a dirt bike. He laughed and said his main concern was the kids and he was just buying something to ride along, then said his daughter was also riding along with training wheels. I didn't see her, but I imagined a lil bitty girl with a 16" bike and basket. These guys do not need an XR-Pro, a hardtail won't make much difference, and those Power Climbers are priced right, will probably keep up with a 10 to 12 y/o boy and last long enough for that son to not want to ride with Dad anymore. And it'll Sure enough keep up with the daughter on training wheels through senior prom :D

Would I recommend a hardtail for someone who has decided he wants to ride low to intermediate impact trails? Yeah, I have one myself.
Would I recommend the XR-Pro to anyone who wants to buy a bike to look cool? If they don't know the difference in a Next Power Climber and the XR-Pro, no.
But if they plan to ride mountain sides and RedBull games, the XR-Pro ain't gonna cut it for very long either. It costs a lot of $$ to be crazy and survive.
The XR-Pro is in the middle, A full suspension bike at Walmart with the highest price tag on the rack. I think that alone sells it more than any amount of common sense. The Ledge, for $100 to $150 less, is a capable bike and would be the comfy "cruiser" on the light trails compared to many 26" bikes..
But for the guy who thinks about it, and sees the perfect potential for whichever bike, for where he wants to go, full suspension or not, It's up to him to lay down the cash and take the chance on having the results he expected.

Research boys! It will save you more $$ and more headaches than anything your buddies tell you to do lol
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby wa_desert_rat » Sun Aug 03, 2014 2:37 pm

Tomcat65 wrote:Research boys! It will save you more $$ and more headaches than anything your buddies tell you to do lol


Lot of truth in that little essay.
WDR
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Re: Why Do New Riders Focus on Full Suspension Bikes?

Postby mirroredtoolbag » Mon Aug 18, 2014 4:05 pm

My son had a next power climber as well, it was exhausting to ride because of the bob. The next had a 1"steerer which made up grading the fork impossible, had a one piece crank which adds to its substantial weight. The bike held up good, the frame was sturdy, it shifted ok and took some abuse but bottomed out in its stroke easily. The diff between the power climber and a XR pro are about as large as the diff between a zebco spin cast fishing reel and a shimano calcutta, huge!!! Ride the power climber in some challenging off road terrain and then ride the XR pro, this will end the debate. Is the power climber worth the money? yeah, depends on what you are looking for. Is the XR pro? the testimonies in the xr pro thread are all the research you need to answer that.
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