New New Bike. Need Advice

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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby Falkon45 » Thu Jul 30, 2015 2:54 pm

In order from My favorite to least favorite:

Diadora Orma
Nakamura Royal
CCM Orion
Supercycle Solaris

I like the Diadora, because it's a mountain bike. 26er, and well capable of upgrades.
The Nakamura because it's basically a 29er mountain bike, but with speed oriented 700c wheels. Definitely rugged enough to take some light trails, still light enough to maneuver (although not like a road bike)
The Orion, because it's just very comfort/commuter oriented. Great bike to travel with. Only gripe I have is it's 21 speeds.
The solaris is bottom of the list. 6 speed rear already makes me not like it. it made the list because it's commuter oriented, and comes with fenders.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby omar » Thu Jul 30, 2015 4:20 pm

Purple Haze wrote:For my taste I would go with the Nakumura because it looks like it can take a pounding better and its 700 cc but truthfully I am surprised at the offerings in Canada for the price.I thought the Canadians would have more offerings for Big Box Bikes, but the Walmart has very little to offer.I know CCM is a big brand with hockey but didn't know they offer bikes as well.The prices for Chinese made goods must come with high tariffs becuause 24 speed bikes are nearly double the American price.


Falkon45 wrote:In order from My favorite to least favorite:

Diadora Orma
Nakamura Royal
CCM Orion
Supercycle Solaris

I like the Diadora, because it's a mountain bike. 26er, and well capable of upgrades.
The Nakamura because it's basically a 29er mountain bike, but with speed oriented 700c wheels. Definitely rugged enough to take some light trails, still light enough to maneuver (although not like a road bike)
The Orion, because it's just very comfort/commuter oriented. Great bike to travel with. Only gripe I have is it's 21 speeds.
The solaris is bottom of the list. 6 speed rear already makes me not like it. it made the list because it's commuter oriented, and comes with fenders.


I was leaning towards the Nakamura, but I read on this website about a bike mechanic saying that he saw a lot of problems with nakamura, and it being their lower tier brand. That was in 2013 though so things might have changed. I'm going to check out the Diadora and the Nakamura tomorrow. I noticed that the Diadora has disc brakes , does that set it apart at all from the others ? I'm mostly on sidewalks though and some light trails as i mentioned so I'm slightly concerned though given that it is a mountain bike. It's price point being $100 off regular price is appealing though.

Yeah unfortunately there isn't much choice here in Canada. As with everything, American prices are usually lower than Canadian unfortunately.

EDIT :
Just noticed this bike on Kijiji
http://www.kijiji.ca/v-mountain-bike/os ... nFlag=true

Is this a good bike ? I noticed it has shimano deore derailleurs, I've read that those are good. Am i right ? Don't know much about bikes as you all probably already know.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby Purple Haze » Fri Jul 31, 2015 1:05 am

29er all the way for the type of riding your doing because they are faster and require less effort.The gt aggressor is a great hartail and for 150 dollars is a very fair asking price and is ride ready but it is your choice.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby omar » Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:31 am

2 other concerns

1. My doctor yesterday told me that I should be careful with bikes as I have a herniated disc and that I would benefit from some kid of gel seat or cushioning. With that in mind what do you recommend? Should I be getting a full suspension in that case? I haven't been experiencing much lately if at all though

2. Winter snow and ice riding . Good idea? It'll be 5-10 minutes for me downhill to my bus stop. Would save me a 15-20 min walk. What would I need to do to the bike? Which bike would survive? Would I even survive? I think this might be possible if roads are cleared but with fresh snow and no salted sidewalks it'd be dangerous.

Thanks for your suggestions and advice so far by the way. Much appreciated.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby Purple Haze » Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:52 am

The prolongated ride position is a major problem with people with back problems.A more upright position helps but is not a cure all.Listen to your doctor first because giving advice on whether you should or should not look after your general health first would be bad advice.Snow and ice with a two wheeled vehicle is also a bad idea given that sliding upsets the balance and there is not that much of a contact patch with bicycles.Regardless of the fat tire bikes that have become so popular you are still risking with falling.You might be too young,but I remember when they sold lawn darts to little kids and that didn't turn out to be such a great idea either.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby Falkon45 » Fri Jul 31, 2015 12:36 pm

I couldn't tell you what seat to look into, as I run pretty small seats. My largest one is aimed towards more comfort, and it he'll, but when others ride the same seat, they complain that it's too small and hurts.

Honestly, a full on 29er mountain bike would be best for you, with two different sets of tires and maybe an adjustable or high rise stem. But this was if you were planning on building a bike.

Bikes take some getting accustomed to in the snow. And it's not the awesome, fresh, loose, unpacked able that you have to worry about. It's the old, packed, nearly slick, pretty much ice that you have to worry about. Unless you have studded tires (do they make those for bikes? Could be cool to try), you're pretty much screwed on a bike. There will be days where you will have to walk, unless you plan on trying to make it happen on two wheels.

So, back to seats... There are some pretty cushy noseless versions that are feesable to help keep your back from flareing up. Full suspension won't help as much as you think. Especially the normal spring "shock" big box versions. The bound isn't what will get you... The rebound will be what hurts. Since they aren't dampened, the spring will decompress just add fast as it compressed. This, will in turn, try to launch you off the bike (the universal rear triangle suspension design is notorious for this), so when you come back down, you're now landing on the seat, chancing you to hurt your back. This could be mitigated by going to an air shock, but it's not eliminated, and that's not money you've spent that you probably didn't want to spend.

A hard trail, with suspension seat post and a nice ergonomic seat will be a good option, as the softest seat isn't always a good deal. I said a 29er mountain bike would be good, because you have more space to fit wider tires. You could go with a 2" slick tire at 55-60 psi (some are rated up to 80) to soften the ride. Then, in snow, you can ride on normal mountain bike tires.
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby BoomerBrian » Fri Jul 31, 2015 3:00 pm

If you have back problems you shouldn't even consider riding on ice and snow. That is an accident waiting to happen.

Best thing to help with the back is a more upright right ride and get off the saddle when you are hitting bumps and let you legs absorb it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
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Re: New New Bike. Need Advice

Postby omar » Fri Jul 31, 2015 4:16 pm

Purple Haze wrote:The prolongated ride position is a major problem with people with back problems.A more upright position helps but is not a cure all.Listen to your doctor first because giving advice on whether you should or should not look after your general health first would be bad advice.Snow and ice with a two wheeled vehicle is also a bad idea given that sliding upsets the balance and there is not that much of a contact patch with bicycles.Regardless of the fat tire bikes that have become so popular you are still risking with falling.You might be too young,but I remember when they sold lawn darts to little kids and that didn't turn out to be such a great idea either.


Thanks for your input. Yea I'm thinking that I'm going to have to find another way to deal with the 20 minute walk in the cold.I fell before on ice just from walking and that hurt enough. I can see biking not ending well. I'll be getting an assessment done at a sports med. clinic soon and we'll see what they say about bikes.

Falkon45 wrote:I couldn't tell you what seat to look into, as I run pretty small seats. My largest one is aimed towards more comfort, and it he'll, but when others ride the same seat, they complain that it's too small and hurts.

Honestly, a full on 29er mountain bike would be best for you, with two different sets of tires and maybe an adjustable or high rise stem. But this was if you were planning on building a bike.

Bikes take some getting accustomed to in the snow. And it's not the awesome, fresh, loose, unpacked able that you have to worry about. It's the old, packed, nearly slick, pretty much ice that you have to worry about. Unless you have studded tires (do they make those for bikes? Could be cool to try), you're pretty much screwed on a bike. There will be days where you will have to walk, unless you plan on trying to make it happen on two wheels.

So, back to seats... There are some pretty cushy noseless versions that are feesable to help keep your back from flareing up. Full suspension won't help as much as you think. Especially the normal spring "shock" big box versions. The bound isn't what will get you... The rebound will be what hurts. Since they aren't dampened, the spring will decompress just add fast as it compressed. This, will in turn, try to launch you off the bike (the universal rear triangle suspension design is notorious for this), so when you come back down, you're now landing on the seat, chancing you to hurt your back. This could be mitigated by going to an air shock, but it's not eliminated, and that's not money you've spent that you probably didn't want to spend.

A hard trail, with suspension seat post and a nice ergonomic seat will be a good option, as the softest seat isn't always a good deal. I said a 29er mountain bike would be good, because you have more space to fit wider tires. You could go with a 2" slick tire at 55-60 psi (some are rated up to 80) to soften the ride. Then, in snow, you can ride on normal mountain bike tires.


Thanks for explaining the issue with full suspension. The suspension seat post and an ergonomic seat sounds like a great idea. I haven't seen any suspension seat posts built into any of the bikes I've looked at, I've only seen it on much more expensive bikes so I guess I'll have to get that as an add-on.

29 mountain bike with slick and knobbed tires.... hmmm... I'm having trouble finding a 29 mountain bike for a good deal, i see a 26 though, the diadora orma. + i'm assuming slick tires will at least cost me 60$ for a set so this is getting slightly expensive. I think I'm going to not bike in the winter because of the danger factor and given that I'm already hurt, I'd rather not get hurt any more. + the cheapest winter tire set as I checked now is $140. This still beats buying an expensive jacket to help me survive the 20min price wise I guess though. Does that change your mind on the type of bike I should get ? or do you think I can do this with a reasonable price ?

BoomerBrian wrote:If you have back problems you shouldn't even consider riding on ice and snow. That is an accident waiting to happen.

Best thing to help with the back is a more upright right ride and get off the saddle when you are hitting bumps and let you legs absorb it.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD


Yea I'm considering not riding on ice and snow. Though when I read that people do it so easily, I wonder whether I'm just being a wimp and would be ok with winter tires.

I usually ride as upright as I can and go without hands sometimes to take the pressure off my low back and put it on my abdomen instead. I'll try getting off the saddle and letting my legs absorb bumps. I'll try that today. Thanks for the tip !
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